credit

visual404:

Todo, en fin, el silencio lo ocupaba, Nicolás Pereda, 2010.

 Like Water for Chocolate (1992) 

womeninthewindow:

Intimidades de Shakespeare y Víctor Hugo (Yulene Olaizola, 2008)

au-miel:

Tiburoneros (The shark hunters, Luis Alcoriza / 1963)

Mexican film tears into culture of corruption

González Iñárritu anuncia creación de complejo cinematográfico

madamebeudet:

paraisos artificiales yulene olaizola (2011)

madamebeudet:

susana luis bunuel (1951)

madamebeudet:

la cucaracha ismael rodriguez (1959)

El incidente / The Incident (Isaac Ezban, 2014)

The Incident takes some huge risks, narratively speaking, and a resourceful Ezban, who has essentially taken on some restrictive and circumscribed snags; he limits the cast to only a few per each isolated vignette, curbing the action to one location, and yet he still makes for some truly intriguing sci-fi. Fans of outlandish, character-driven psychological mysteries such as Lost or Twin Peaks, or acolytes of prolific speculative fiction writer Philip K. Dick — whose 1958 head trip novel Time Out of Joint is explicitly referenced — will find much to be rhapsodic about here. Ezban is a thoughtful, resourceful, and adept director. Using a budget that must have been a mere fraction of a fraction of, say, Christopher Nolan’s undue Inception, Ezban takes an infinitely more imaginative and precarious approach, with a far better payoff.

(…)The Incident is a gripping, good-looking, and resounding achievement, filled to the fringe with humour and hubris, too, both essential ingredients to make such strange fiction so fulfilling. Its outcome is hard fought and edifying, reflecting enlightened excellence.” (Shane Scott-Travis, Vivascene) 

¿Cuál es tu película mexicana de horror favorita?

What’s your favorite mexican horror film?

exhaustedscreen:

Nicolas Pereda, Where are their stories?, 2007.

'…the careful, often enigmatic minimalism embraced by Pereda’s films – equally through their fractured and elliptical narratives as their preference for extended sequence shots – is best understood in the context of similarly ambitious filmmaking practices explored by influential artists such as Portugal’s Pedro Costa and Argentina’s Lisandro Alonso.' - Harvard Film Archive.

bittercinema:

Screengrab from Santo contra Blue Demon en la Atlantida (1970)